Pumpkin seeds GWS

Pumpkins, and their seeds, are native to the Americas, and indigenous species are found across North America, South America, and Central America. The word "pepita" is consistent with this heritage, since it comes from Mexico, where the Spanish phrase "pepita de calabaza" means "little seed of squash."
Pumpkin seeds have been a celebrated food among many Native American tribes, who treasured them both for their dietary and medicinal properties. In South America, the popularity of pumpkin seeds has been traced at least as far back as the Aztec cultures of 1300-1500 AD. From the Americas, the popularity of pumpkin seeds spread to the rest of the globe through trade and exploration over centuries. In parts of Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean (especially Greece), pumpkin seeds became a standard part of everyday cuisine. Culinary and medical traditions in India and other parts of Asia also incorporate this seeds very well.

Pumpkin seeds - also known as “pepitas” - are dark green, flat seeds. Some are encased in a yellow - white husk (often called the "shell"), although some varieties of pumpkins produce seeds without shells. Pumpkin seeds have a malleable, chewy texture and a subtly sweet, nutty flavour. While roasted pumpkin seeds are probably best known for their role as a perennial Halloween treat, these seeds are so delicious, and nutritious, that they can be enjoyed throughout the year. In many food markets, pepitas are available in all forms described above - raw and shelled, raw and unshelled, roasted and shelled, roasted and unshelled.

Pumpkin seeds grown without shell